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CALIFORNIA: THE FIRST LARGE SCALE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE
ARE NOW KICKING IN - MILLIONS ARE AT RISK AS WATER DISAPPEARS
Immediate help is needed to save these horses - can you help?
Posted: January 23, 2014
Horses, young and old have run out of food - Next??? PLEASE HELP
Dust Bowl
Written by Reg Presley
'The Troggs'

Some folks are living in a dust bowl
I've seen them on TV, ah

Some folks are living in a dust bowl
Don't love like you and me, ah

Some folks live in little boxes
Underneath the railway station
Some folks live in little boxes
What a way to run a nation

When after all is said and done
we've only got one earth, one sun
there's nowhere in our universe
where we can go if things get worse

We'd better make a start today
the problems here won't go away
we'd better take just one step back
cos our beautiful bubble is about to crack

Some folks are breaking down the ozone.

Breaking down the ozone layer
Some folks are messin' with the ozone

Hope they're around when it's time to
pay, ah

Some folks are cuttin' down the forest
Cuttin' down the forest station
Some folks are cuttin' down the forest

Do we need the devastation?

Cos after all is said and done
we've only got one earth, one sun.
There's nowhere in our universe
where we can go if things get worse.

We'd better make a start today
the problems here won't go away.
We'd better take just one step back cos
our beautiful bubble is about to crack

Some folks are living in a dust bowl
Some folks live in little boxes

Some folks are breaking down the ozone

Some folks are cutting down the forest.

Listen to the song.
PURCHASE
 California drought forces ranchers to say good bye to horses

(Tivy Valley, Calif.) - One by one, Harold Kelly’s family of horses crest the hill, kicking up dust. Their
hooves tread over stones and packed dirt . It’s another mild, 70-degree day in central California. In
the dead of winter, there’s not a cloud in sight.  And there’s no rain in the forecast.

Fifty horses live on Kelly’s 300-acre pasture outside of Fresno, Calif., an area that is by and large
the farming and agricultural hub of the Golden State.  “Every horse out here, I’ve raised – but for
the exception of two,” he says. He watches his herd sip from a water trough –  a welcome oasis amid
hills coated with brown soil. Usually, the land is lush and green. This year is different. The state is in
the midst of a historic dry spell , one declared by California Gov. Jerry Brown as perhaps the worst
drought in a century.

“Normally, it’d be raining and we’d have grass growing…the grass is basically all gone,” Kelly says.
Simply put, there’s nothing left on the ground for the horses to eat.

It hasn’t rained in Tivy Valley since December 7, 2013. Even then, the area had only received .
15inches  of rain fall, according to Paul Jones, cooperative program manager at the National
Weather Service. The rainfall total for 2013 was  a scant 3.01 inches. An average year brings 11.5
inches of rain.

These circumstances have forced Kelly to find other ways to keep his horses alive. Every day, he
fills his truck with hay purchased through a retailer, and drives into the dry pasture to feed his herd.
He gives a loud whistle, and they come running.

“I borrowed money, I hate to even say that. But I recently borrowed money to buy hay,” he says.
With hay prices on the rise due to the drought, Kelly spends $800-$1,000 a week on feed – money
he doesn’t have.  “I don’t really have much of a choice. That’s the way I look at it.”

“Some of them have dropped off a little bit in weight,” Kelly says, taking a look at a mare whose ribs
are beginning to show. “They would be fat if there was rain.”

Central California thrives off the agriculture and livestock industry – fields of vegetables, fruits and
tree crops are deteriorating rapidly. The state houses 80,500 farms and ranches, and generates
more than $100 billion in economic activity, according to the California Department of Food and
Agriculture. And on the front lines, farmers and ranchers like Kelly are facing heart-wrenching
decisions.  “There are a whole lot of people like me. Some of them are hurting worse than I am.”

For Kelly, there’s only one thing he can do. “I hate to get rid of them…but it’s time,” he says.

Whole article -
HERE


Anthony Caglia runs Silver Wings Horse Rescue, dedicated to the rehabilitation and placement of
orphaned horses. As Kelly’s neighbor and fellow horseman, he’s promised to do what he can to
help, even as he struggles in the face of the drought.

His 60-acre equine ranch is at capacity with thoroughbreds, quarter horses and appaloosas up for
adoption.  Since the dry spell hit, calls for help have increased significantly. “Usually, we get a
phone call 2-4 times a month….we’re getting them 2-3 times a week now. We’re at capacity, there’s
a waiting list.” Like Kelly, he now purchases hay for the rescue horses, and relies on donations to
keep his organization running.

“I’ve been in this area all my life, and I’ve never seen it this bad. It was just upon us so fast.
Hopefully we can get some rain, get some pasture back in and get some people back to work. It’s on
the verge of very desperate,” he says.
Please contact Silver Wings Horse Rescue HERE
Silverwings:
Our Motto;

You cannot do a
kindness too
soon,
for you never
know how soon,
it will be too
late...
US Drought Monitor - HERE
The Dust Bowl Drought (of the 1930s)

The Dust Bowl drought was a natural disaster that severely affected much of the United
States during the 1930s. The drought came in three waves, 1934, 1936, and 1939-40, but
some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years.
The "dust bowl" effect was caused by sustained drought conditions compounded by years of
land Photos from Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives management practices that
left topsoil susceptible to the forces of the wind. The soil, depleted of moisture, was lifted by
the wind into great clouds of dust and sand which were so thick they concealed the sun for
several days at a time. They were referred to as" black blizzards".

Full article
Please help support
Colin Andrews
Research
Please help support
Colin Andrews
Research
CONTINUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE
Select to watch.
Thanks to Erin Burnett - CNN
From Dust Bowl
by Reg Presley,
The Troggs

"Cos after all is said and done, we've only got
one earth, one sun.

There's nowhere in our universe where we
can go if things get worse.

We'd better make a start today, the problems
here won't go away.

We'd better take just one step back cos our
beautiful bubble is about to crack"

See left column - Athens Andover
January 2014
Colin's Appeal
Can you help these animals?